A checklist for using your values in your creative business projects featured image - via Pexels

Here’s a Checklist for Using Your Values in Your Creative Business Projects


 

Having strong personal values tends to be a common factor among creative business owners.

You can use these values in lots of different ways for deepening or growing your business.

One of the ways might be understanding which are non-negotiable and which are negotiable values, so you can choose the projects you want to work on with confidence. Read more about that here.

I have clear personal values which help ground me and my life, including the work I choose to do.

Before I take on any job, I have a checklist of questions related to my values which I run through to see where the job fits, and where it doesn’t.

I wanted to share how I made that checklist with you so you can create one for your own creative business.

Everyone’s values are different, so me sharing my exact set of questions won’t be that useful to you – but sharing the way I’ve constructed those questions will help you get organised so you can use your own values with confidence.

 


 

The first question I ask is always:

What are my first impressions and intuitions?

Sometimes, our intuition can tell us everything we need to know. We might not be able to explain, logically, what the problem is, but our intuition feels it.

The value questions are therefore a way to counter this intuition and make sure you’re not just relying on gut instinct.

How am I using [a value] in this project?

I ask myself exactly how I will be using each of my values in this project. Some of them are very clear: for example, for my personal value of ‘helping’, I can ask “How am I helping in this project?”.

Other of my values, like ‘nature’, require a bit more thought: the question might be “How am I valuing and respecting nature in this project?”

According to [a value], what specifically will I get out of this project?

I then ask myself what the benefits are to me of doing this project, in relation to my values. For example, one of my values is ‘learning’, so I ask myself, “What specifically will I learn during this project?”.

If I find it difficult to answer these questions, I can then ask myself “Why am I really taking on this project?”. The answer may be because it’s bread-and-butter work, in which case I can answer the remaining questions with this in mind.

Will what I get out of this project according to [a value] be useful to me in the future?

It’s important to think long-term with your creative business, so I consider what I might get out of a project, according to a value, which might be useful to me later down the line.

One of my personal values is ‘play’, so I might ask myself “Will the playful experimentation and new ideas I get out of this project be useful to me in the future?”.

You’ll have noticed that I don’t stick to a rigid question scheme, and instead mould it to fit what I’m talking about.

The key is to developing a themed question you can actually answer, not reproducing a specific question structure that might not make much sense to you.

How does the client/customer fulfil [a value]?

You’re going to be working quite closely with someone on a project and therefore writing down your understanding of how they fulfil (or don’t fulfil) a particular value of yours is very useful.

As an example, one of my personal values is ‘love’, so I ask myself: “Do the people who work at this company really love what they do?”, “Does the client demonstrate love and connection in their relationship with me and their customers?” and “Does the client believe love is an important part of their work?”.

Finally, I ask myself a set of questions based on the principles of sustainable marketing. These are more specific to my way of working, but I wanted to share one question with you which will add something extra to your values checklist.

How does this project acknowledge its role and responsibility in shaping the future of:
… the businesses involved in it?
… the customer receiving it?
… the community surrounding it?

As an independent creative business owner, this last question is so important. You want your business to last, and you want it to deepen or grow. You want to connect with your customer and other creative business people like you.

Understanding how this project – this one on your desk right now – will be shaping the future of the businesses that are involved with it (including your own), the customer receiving it and the community surrounding it is therefore essential.

By understanding these things, you can understand whether the project will help your creative business connect, deepen, grow and live for a long time. From that, you can make a more confident decision.

 


Here’s the full checklist of question structures so you can start creating your own:

  • What are my first impressions and intuitions?
  • How am I using [a value] in this project?
  • According to [a value], what specifically will I get out of this project?
  • Will what I get out of this project according to [a value] be useful to me in the future?
  • How does the client/customer fulfil [a value]?
  • How does this project acknowledge its role and responsibility in shaping the future of:
    … the businesses involved in it?
    … the customer receiving it?
    … the community surrounding it?

 

Having a values-led creative business means having a business that’s true to who you are and what you want to achieve in the world.

These questions are a simple way for you to organise those values so you can feel confident about selecting the right projects for you.

If you’ve found this article useful, please share it with your network.

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A checklist for using your values in your creative business projects

How I Pick My Projects Based on Personal Values as a Creative Business Owner - Photo by Annie Spratt via Unsplash

How I Pick My Projects Based on Personal Values as a Creative Business Owner


The other week I had a fun brunch with Alix, who asked me:

“How do you do the work you do, and manage to stick to your values?”

If you run your own creative business, there will always be a time when you have to make a decision about a job which pays well, but doesn’t fit your values.

It might be that it’s the wrong sort of client, the terms of the project aren’t ideal, or it’s just not the sort of work you want to be known for.

The decision is between your personal values and the money.

Sometimes, you will choose the money, and I think that’s completely fine.

Bread-and-butter work might not be exciting but it pays the bills. It’s not called champagne-and-cupcakes work. It’s called bread-and-butter because it gets the cash in the bank and basics on the table.

I’ve taken jobs for the money, because I see what that money could do. It could pay the bills. It could be invested.

It could also buy me time elsewhere to spend developing projects and work that aren’t commercially viable yet. That money can get me organised and help me feel confident.

The key to taking on a job, even it’s mainly for the money, and still running a values-led business is knowing which of your personal values are negotiable, and which are non-negotiable.

For your creative business, a negotiable value is one you can easily find in your life without having to do it through work.

If the job doesn’t fit a negotiable value, you can choose to take the cognitive hit (and the cash).

For example, one of my values is ‘play’. It’s a negotiable value. Not all of the jobs I’m offered enable me to ‘play’ in one form or another.

But I might take those jobs because I can easily get ‘play’ elsewhere in my life at the same time as doing that job (for example, through creating my planner or what I wear that day).

One of my other values is ‘helping’. This is a non-negotiable value. I won’t take a job if I believe my work or the outcome of my work won’t help someone. Normally, this is the end user.

For example, if I got offered a copywriting job where I was ‘helping’ the client, but the article I had to write was focused purely on selling to the reader (the end user) and not giving them anything ‘helpful’, I wouldn’t accept that job.

It’s about knowing your personal values, knowing which are negotiable, and allowing yourself to take that bread-and-butter work if you can see that it will help you elsewhere.

Problems happen if you, as a creative business owner, consistently allow all your personal values to be negotiable.

You end up feeling frustrated at yourself, frustrated with the work you’re doing, and disappointed that you’re not creating a space in the world doing what you want to be known for.

I’ve worked in businesses whose values all became negotiable, and it ate away at the confidence of the people who worked there. There’s nothing to believe in when you negotiate on all your values.

Values are like roots; they steady and support you, and in times of confusion they can be relied on to ground you in what you know to be right.

Some of those personal values will be negotiable, and that’s okay. Know them and make sure to find them elsewhere if you decide to take on work which doesn’t fit with that value.

Sometimes you will take on a job for the money, and that’s okay too. Use the money wisely to help support yourself and direct the time towards what you really want to do.

I want you to think about your personal values.

  • What are they?
  • Which are non-negotiable, and why?
  • Which ones are negotiable? How could you fulfil these values if you take on work which doesn’t fulfil them?
  • What questions would you ask about a job to find out whether it fulfilled your values?
  • Do you know how much ‘bread-and-butter’ (aka cash) you need each month to keep doing projects which fulfil your values?

 


Knowing my personal values and deciding to build a creative business and brand around them changed my life. The key is knowing exactly how to use those values with confidence.

If you’ve found this article useful, please share it with your network.

 

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How I pick my projects based on personal values as a creative business owner

How to organise your creative business so you can take a holiday without worrying

How to Organise Your Creative Business so You Can Take a Holiday Without Worrying

You’re convinced you need a holiday. Now what?

(If you’re not convinced you do, read this first.)

The biggest myth for creative business owners when it comes to taking a holiday is that their business will collapse without them being there.

The truth is it won’t.

It might be tricky to manage. You might have to set up some things in advance. But you are not going to lose all your customers, piss off all your suppliers, and your business will not go up in flames if you are not there.

Your creative business does need you to function effectively and brilliantly, in its 10 out of 10 perfect experience. But if you go away, it might come down to a nine out of 10. Eight, at a minimum. Because you have a good business, with great customer service and good processes in place.

It doesn’t matter if your creative business is not perfect all the time.

(I really need to take this bit of advice to heart, pronto.)

You will go, you will drink sangria/long island iced tea/martinis [delete as appropriate], you will return and your business will still be brilliant. In fact, it’ll be more brilliant for the break you’ve had.

Here’s how to make that break work.

 

How to take a holiday as a creative business owner (and relax while you’re there)

 

1. Let customers know you’re going on holiday

Yes, that’s right, tell people you’re going away! Admit you need a holiday, and you’re taking one, and you’re going to bloody enjoy it. You are a human and so are your customers, and they will respect your honesty.

Be clear on how long you’ll be away for and what changes they should expect to your normal service. This information will alleviate any issues that might arise because you’re not there; people know you’re away so are likely to cut you a little bit of slack. How many times have you visited an Etsy shop to find that the owner is ‘on holiday’? No-one gets pissed off; you just favourite the shop, sign up for email notifications and forget about it.

On that point; remember the appearance of exclusivity I mentioned in my article about saying ‘no’? A holiday does the same sort of thing. You aren’t always available – customers will have to wait. And if you have the right processes set up – like an email wait list – then you can actually encourage that exclusivity and gain an eager customer base at the same time.

 

2. Schedule marketing content

You can let your existing customers know you’re going to be away while at the same time making sure you’re still drawing new customers towards you by scheduling marketing content.

I’d recommend you do this for digital marketing content only; responding to print amends are too stressful to try and do while you’re sunning yourself on a beach somewhere. You can schedule social media content using the channels’ in-built tools (for example, scheduling Facebook posts for your business page) or do it all in one place using a third-party scheduling tool like Buffer or Hootsuite.

You can also schedule blog posts for when you’re away, as well as other digital marketing like email newsletters. All of this, of course, does require extra time before you go away to set it all up. But to keep things ‘ticking over’, and especially if your holiday coincides with a useful marketing season for your creative business, scheduling marketing content is incredibly useful.

 

3. Avoid marketing clashes

This seems like an obvious one, but make sure you don’t accidentally schedule any marketing promotions – like a sale or a discount voucher – while you’re away on holiday. Ongoing content which keeps customers engaged is fine, but anything designed to draw in big crowds is difficult to manage from afar and there’s more chance of things going wrong.

Depending on the type of creative business you own, you might find your potential busiest periods are also during traditional holiday times; for example, around Christmas boutique retailers might not get much of a break as they put in the hours for gift-buying customers.

If you can take holidays at the quietest times of your business year, it can be useful for managing your business and making the most of that productivity kick when you get back and jump onto the next busy period.

 

4. Be clear about whether you’re available or not

If you’ve been used to running your creative business single-handedly, the idea of not being in regular contact with customers and potential customers probably makes you feel uncomfortable. It’s also totally natural to end up checking work-related emails or messages on holiday – especially if you love your work.

However, before you go on holiday be clear on whether or not you want to be contacted by customers, suppliers or staff. Once you’ve chosen what you want, stick to it. You might feel like the constant communication – like the ’email pressure’ I mentioned – is actually what you need to escape from. If so, let your customers and other contacts know, and do not look at work messages while you’re away.

If you do, you’ll slide back into it very quickly. If you’re worried things will slip without you to field the communications, you could hire a virtual assistant (VA) for the duration of your holiday, who’ll be able to manage any issues that come up.

Alternatively, if business communication isn’t the thing you need to escape from, then let people know you’ll be available but set yourself specific times when you’ll check and respond to work-related communication. It’s a good idea to do this all the time, but especially on holiday, so you have clear boundaries of when you can switch off from work.

 

Time to enjoy your time off.

 

Taking a holiday when you run your own creative business is essential for your health and the continuing health of your business. It’ll mean you come back refreshed and ready for the next challenge.

Managing your business while you’re away is possible: let customers know you’re going away, schedule your marketing content and avoid any big clashes, and be clear on whether you’re available for business chat – or not.

And make sure you enjoy your holiday.

 

 How to organise your creative business so you can take a holiday without worrying

Four Ways a Crystal Clear Brand Can Help You Build Your Creative Business | Eleanor Snare Sustainable Marketing for Creative Businesses

Four Ways a Crystal Clear Brand Can Help You Build Your Creative Business

On 28th September 2017 I’m launching a new do-it-yourself product for creative business owners to help them create a crystal clear brand.

It’s a downloadable workbook that takes you through all the essential, heart-and-soul elements of a brand, from your purpose and vision to your personality and core messages.


A brand sounds great – but it also sounds like a lot of work.

Why is having a crystal clear brand useful for creative business owners? Here are four simple ways it’ll help you build your creative business and reduce the stress and struggle you might be experiencing.


1. More effective decision making

With the right brand, the biggest impact you’ll see on your business is your ability to make more effective decisions. A brand is like a guiding light; it helps us decide what’s worth spending our time and energy on, and which things we should let go.

This applies to operational decisions – like the sort of products you should make and how you should make them – as much as it does to marketing tactics.

2. Less stress and struggle.

With more effective decisions comes less stress and less struggle. Creative business owners already have a hundred different plates to spin, from graphic design to accounting to email marketing.

Having a crystal clear brand makes spinning those plates much easier and smoother, making the whole experience of running your business more enjoyable.

3. Easier and enjoyable marketing

A consciously-created, crystal clear brand also makes it easier and enjoyable to focus your marketing in the right direction.

Rather than thinking about all of the things you should be doing, because someone on the Internet told you it was important, you can use your brand to guide you on focusing on what’s essential and relevant to you and your customer.

4. A consistent, clear message

For me, one of the most exciting things about developing a crystal clear brand is that it means your creative business will have a consistent and clear message for your customers.

Instead of not knowing what to say to your customers online, in print or in person – or worse, not really knowing why you’re saying it – your brand will guide you. You’ll have consciously created a message that’s clear and consistent; one of the key ways in which businesses achieve success.


In this article I talked about how brand is created whether you’re doing it consciously or not. With a brand that’s crystal clear, you realise you can be in charge of that conversation.

You can give your customers the message you want them to have, not rely on the one they make up about you when you’re not in the room.


Follow me on Instagram for more updates on the Crystal Clear Brand workbook

Screenshot of Trello board with lists on desktop

Three More Tools I Use to Maximise My Energy and Time + Choosing the Right Tools as A Creative Business Owner

I recently shared an article on the Five Tools I Use to Maximise My Energy and Time as a Creative Business Owner. There, I mentioned that:

“Having the right tools to help you do the jobs you need to do can make a huge difference to your enjoyment and fulfillment in your creative business.”

Here are three more tools that I rely on heavily in my daily work to bring me enjoyment and fulfilment, plus some helpful tips on choosing the right tools for you and your creative business.


Voice to text apps

One tool I use a lot is the voice to text function, particularly in my email and Google Drive. I’ve even started using it in Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp.

I’ve started using this because I discovered my work, and my comprehension of the work I’m doing, is often most effective when I explain it out loud. Ideally, I like to explain it to other people, but that’s not always possible – so explaining it to myself is the next best option.

It also saves me having to type out my thoughts; surprisingly this does take quite a long time, even for someone who’s spent five years doing big copywriting projects.

I’m prone to arm and shoulder pain if I use my phone too much (damn you Instagram!) so using voice to text in messaging also saves me that discomfort.

One benefit of the voice to text function is you can often be more natural in your writing and, at the same time, more concise. Both of these are great for clear communication.

This one tool has saved me a huge amount of time; I recommend you try it if you end up having to write lots of emails.

Screenshot of the voice to text function in Google Docs
Screenshot of the voice to text function in Google Docs

 


Journal and diary

I use a couple of non-digital tools as well as these online ones. These tools are important to me both professionally and on a more personal level.

On Instagram, I share pictures of my journal; I use this to have an overview of my week in one place. I try to make this overview as appealing to look at as possible, so I actually want to check in on my calendar. It also means I’d encouraged to look back on it, to see what I did, achieved and was grateful for.

As well as this journal I have a small diary which I use almost like a future planner – my journal is for the week ahead while the diary is for the whole year. It helps me to see, very quickly, whether I’m busy or not, what days I’m working and when I have availability to work with clients.

I do include some information about what I’m doing on the day in the diary, but really it’s an overview.

I find it a lot easier to check this overview on paper, and if someone wants to set a meeting or book me in for some work, I find I remember it more when I write it down.

This process of doing something on paper and then translating it into a digital form (like my Google Calendar) might seem like it’s not the best use of my time or energy; for me, it works well.

By writing it down, it means I’ve acknowledged and will remember I’ve committed to something. The digital version is then a helpful reminder for me and other people.

 


Trello

The final tool I use every day – and probably check something like every hour – is Trello. I’d originally tried to use Trello for some of my work with my students and a couple of client projects, but I never really got the hang of it.

However, this year I’ve got much more interested in it because of the way I’m planning my time. I use a particular system which I learnt in a program run by Jo Martin from One of Many. In this system, you allocate tasks and batch them together according to the type of energy they require.

For example, if you are at a time in your creative business where you need to have lots of meetings where you’ll be making decisions, you would match those meetings together; not because they’re meetings but because you are in a specific type of decision-making energy.

I’ve found Trello to be useful in helping me quickly code and allocate activities to different days depending on the energy they require.

If you haven’t used Trello before, it has a very similar feel to Pinterest. There are different boards which have different cards on them; a bit like Pinterest boards with different pins on them. Each card is a task and each board is a project. There’s another layer to Trello called lists, which are what the the cards fit into.

 

Screenshot of Trello board with lists on desktop
Screenshot of Trello board with lists on desktop, showing different days and tasks as ‘cards’

 

An example would be exhibiting at an upcoming craft fair. You might create a board for this craft fair (called ‘Craft Fair’) where all of the things you need to think about and the tasks you need to undertake would go.

You might have a list titled ‘Display inspiration’, and another called ‘Marketing’ (for thing you would do before and after the event. You may have another list called ‘Stock check’ and another called ‘Promotional materials’.

On each of these lists you would have a number of cards, each of which was a task you needed to do. So on the ‘Stock check’ list you might have cards saying:

  • Look through current catalogue
  • Count how many different products I have
  • Decide which new products I need to make

In your ‘Promotional materials’ list, you might have:

  • Take photographs for flyers
  • Write copy for flyers
  • Design flyers
  • Get flyers printed and delivered

 

Screenshot of a single list in the Trello mobile app
Screenshot of a single list in the Trello mobile app

 

Trello was originally developed as a tool to facilitate work between different people, but I’ve found using it independently to be really successful.

You can set deadlines for your tasks and tick them off as complete. You can also colour code them according to different activities; for example, you might have three different craft fairs you’re going to do in the next two months, so you could assign a different colour to each of those and to the different tasks.

 

Screenshot of single Trello card showing image attachments on desktop
Screenshot of single Trello card showing image attachments on desktop

 

The tasks themselves are also very rich in detail; you can add photographs, links, documents and comments – which is great for when you’re keeping an update of what you’re doing (essentially, talking to yourself!).

Most creative business owners have a huge number of things going on at one time. I’ve found Trello to be really useful in helping me plan my day, my week and even my months effectively by having a list of tasks to look at every day, so even when there’s lots going on I feel like I know what’s coming up next.

In particular, Trello’s flexibility is very appealing; if something doesn’t get done, I can quite literally move it to the next day.

 

Screenshot of single Trello card showing checklist attachment on desktop
Screenshot of single Trello card showing checklist attachment on desktop

 

I can also keep all of the little bits of information I need for a task in one place; for example, I recently visited a client and on the card for this task I included a link to their office on Google Maps, a screenshot of the walk I would need to do from the train station, and a screenshot of the train times – all in one tiny card! This saved me a lot of time because I wasn’t constantly opening apps or searching for the right information.

Although it can be tricky to get started with Trello, it’s one of my most-used tools, and one I’d highly recommend if you’re a creative business owner who likes things to be visual.

You can download and see Trello here: Android / iPhone / Web


Choosing your tools

Having a good set of tools to help you run your creative business can make things more enjoyable, maximise your energy and maximise your time. Everyone is different, so the tools that’ll work for you and your business may be very different to mine.

However, for a creative business owner, here are some of the things to look out for when you’re choosing the right tool to use.

The ability to set deadlines or time frames
This is helpful to keep you on track and make sure the things you want to get done do get done. Some tools have better deadline-setting options than others.

Colour coding or another type of categorisation
I find colour coding the most effective way to see categories quickly, and all of the tools I’ve mentioned have this functionality. If you’re a ‘visual’ person, this can make a huge difference in your use of a tool and how well it maximises your time.

Look for tools where colour coding is a normal and comprehensive function.

Flexibility
A tool should be flexible – which means you should be able to use it easily, change things easily, and not feel like it’s taking you more time to use than it is to do the things you want to do.

One of the problems I have with Outlook Calendar is it sometimes feels like it’s more time-consuming to use it with my colleagues at the university than simply emailing them to arrange a meeting time.

Flexibility is key, otherwise that tool will not be doing what it needs to do which is maximising your energy and time.

Content-rich
Most online tools now will allow you to add images, links, and more. If the tool has this functionality, use it; it helps you keep all the bits you need in one place, which ultimately saves you the energy of having to look for everything.

One of the most important things to remember when you start to use tools in your business to maximise your energy and time is to spend time setting them up properly.

If you use a tool incorrectly, it’ll end up costing you more in time and energy than it’s saving you.


What’s next?

The old adage is ‘the right tool for the right job’. That applies whether you’re trying to put a table together, or organise the next year of your creative business. Finding the right tool takes time, setting it up can take even more time, but this is time well spent.

Once they’re up and running, the right tools should help you, not hinder you. They should allow you to put your energy and your time in the place which is going to make the most impact for your creative business.

The tools I’ve mentioned all help me do this; what will you use?


Crystal Clear Brand - A Workbook for Creative Business Owners horizontal
The best tool for your creative business

In a few weeks I’m launching a do-it-yourself product on the best tool of all for maximising your time and energy in your creative business.

It’s a workbook guiding you through creating a crystal clear brand in an interactive, friendly and engaging way.

Your brand is the best tool for your business, because it helps you make decisions about everything from the products you make to the pictures you share on Pinterest, saving you time and energy.

If you’re interested in updates about the launch, sign up below.

To say thank you for signing up, once you’ve confirmed your email address you’ll get a free copy of my guide written specifically for creative business owners: How to Sell In Person Without Feeling Weird.


 

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If you feel like you're always trying to spin a hundred plates as a creative business owner, take a look at these three essential tools I use everyday - plus some advice on choosing the right tools for you to use.

The 5 Tools I Use to Maximise My Time and Energy as a Creative Business Owner - logos of tools - Eleanor Snare

The 5 Tools I Use to Maximise My Energy and Time as a Creative Business Owner

In my article today I wanted to share with you some of the tools I use regularly, often on a daily basis, to help me make the most of my energy and time when I’m running my creative business.

Having the right tools to help you do the jobs you need to do can make a huge difference to your enjoyment and fulfillment in your creative business.

I’ve used and tested these tools in running my business, including keeping track of my client work and the marketing activity I do, and they’ve helped me a lot.

Whatever your creative business, there’s definitely a case (and a space) for using them.

 


Google Calendar

I use Google Calendar and its full functionality to help me keep an accurate schedule and communicate what I’m doing to clients and family.

I have a specific public calendar which shows which days I’m available for work; I update this every day and I can send potential clients a link to this calendar on my website. All they need to do is check the calendar and see if my free time fits in with their project.

Another calendar is used to show my partner and family what I’m doing and when. So, if they ever need to check I’ll be home for dinner or free for a day out, they can do so without having to take too much time out of their day (or interrupt me in my work). And I also have a simple calendar which shows me the work activities I’m doing that day.

The monthly view on the Google Calendar app, showing my two different calendars.
The monthly view on the Google Calendar app, showing my two different calendars.

I really like Google Calendar because of the colour coding options, the reminder system and a whole host of other features which let you plug your schedule in and rely on it to do the complicated work for you.

It takes a bit of time to set it up properly, but once I’d done it I’ve found I save my time – and other people’s – from having the information in one place.

Google Calendar is much easier to use and more intuitive than any other calendar I’ve tried; if you’re not already using it to communicate with your clients, then – especially for service-led creative businesses – this could be a really good and completely free option.

Here are two separate calendars: the yellow is my public 'availability' calendar I share with my clients, and the grey/orange is my personal calendar I share with family.
Here are two separate calendars: the yellow is my public ‘availability’ calendar I share with my clients, and the grey/orange is my personal calendar I share with family.

 


Google Keep

Another Google tool I use is Google Keep; mainly as a phone app but also occasionally in my web browser. Google Keep is essentially a board of sticky notes, which you can colour-code, attach pictures to, include links and more.

The set up helps you keep on top of the myriad of little things you want to do, read, buy or see but perhaps right now you want to focus on something more important.

I use Google Keep to brain dump anything interesting I think about or find, when I find it. So on my phone, if I spot an interesting blog post I want to read later and not interrupt my current work, I’ll share it from my browser via Google Keep. This creates a sticky note in the app which I can go back to later and sift through.

You can also categorise your sticky notes; for example, I tend to keep a track of the money I’m spending each day in Google Keep and then formally add these to my expenses these at the end of the week.

It’s a really good alternative to constantly jotting down things to look at in my notebook, because it takes up less space and there’s more options for visual categorisation.

This can really help save time when it comes to engaging with the things you want to look at or read later on.

For me, it stops a five-minute distraction becoming a 55-minute one, saving me time and focusing my energy in the right place.

Screenshot of the Google Keep mobile app
What Google Keep looks like in the mobile app, including pure link notes, colour coding and links within notes.

 


Outlook Tasks

Because I work in two different capacities – one as a marketing consultant for creative businesses and one as a marketing tutor at university – I have to use different tools to fit in with the different organisations I work with.

This is especially true when I’m working directly with others who are used to doing everything via email, or a more traditional file-based system.

When I’m working at the university, one of the tools I rely on the most heavily is the task functionality in Outlook. I find this tool very useful, because I get a lot of emails and small tasks sent to me via email; for example, to dig out a document for someone or respond to a student email.

The task functionality in Outlook allows you to very quickly set an email as a task, including categorisation by colour and a specific deadline. This means instead of having a stuffed inbox which I have to sift and respond to, I have a task list of administrative activities each with a specific, simple deadline.

This saves me a lot of energy because I’m not having to make decisions every day about which tasks to complete, nor am I searching through my email for the right documents; it’s all joined up in the task functionality.

Your email provider might be able to do this for you; I also use Gmail and there are options for setting emails as tasks and ‘snoozing’ them for a certain time so you can respond to them when you have the right energy.

Screenshot showing Outlook tasks on desktop
Here’s what the Outlook task functionality looks like on my desktop at work; you can see how it divides up tasks according to deadline.

 


Tide

One app I really enjoy using is called Tide; I shared a picture of this on my Instagram stories recently.

Tide is a very simple, free app which helps you focus through playing ‘white noise’-style sounds. You can choose your sound style, including rain, a busy cafe, the ocean and rainforest. These sounds play for a specific amount of time; automatically the app sets a 25 minute period of focus, but you can change this (if you prefer or need something shorter or longer).

After 25 minutes, it pings to let you know to take a break. You can even set a specific length of break, and when it’s done it’ll automatically start playing again.

Screenshot of the Tide mobile app with the Forest sound selected
My favourite Tide sound selection: the rainforest. Click on ‘Start’ and the circle begins a countdown.

I found this app useful because I spend a lot of time on the computer, which isn’t always good for our health. Being able to focus intently for a short period of time – for example, when I’m writing up a workshop for a client – then be reminded to take a break where I can stretch or make a cup of tea is really useful.

Mentally, it also helps to know if you’re doing a particularly challenging task (like me sorting out my expenses), you just have to listen to the sounds: when the sounds stop, you stop.

It’s a good way to chunk out big projects that feel overwhelming too.

Screenshot of the settings in the Tide mobile app
Tide’s settings let you choose the length of focus time, break options and even ‘focus goals’.

 


Toggl

While I use Tide to focus for a specific amount of time, I use an app and website called Toggl to help me track the amount of time I’m spending on business activities.

In Toggl, you can set up projects and record how much time you’re spending on different tasks and different projects. If, for example, your creative business involves commissions, this could be a great way to track how much time you’re spending on each of your clients.

It could even be as simple as helping you price your products accurately by understanding how long they realltake to make.

It’s very simple to use; you click the ‘play’ button and it’ll start to time you. When you’re finished, you click the ‘stop’ button and it will have recorded the amount of time you’ve taken on the task.

Screenshot of Toggl showing the main timer summary
The summary page from the Toggl app; the colour coding applies to different projects. On the right are the times taken on a task.

A great feature is the weekly or monthly reports you can access which show you, in one glance, how much time you’re spending on different activities.

By understanding where I’m spending my time, I can make the most of it in the future, and Toggl saves me energy as I’m not worrying about how much I am over- or under-quoting on client work.

This app is very useful if you have lots of different projects going on in your creative business (which I know you do) or if you want to do an audit of how much time you think you might be spending on tasks. Like scrolling through cake recipes on Pinterest.

That there’s an app as well as a website is ideal, because you can time activities which are more ‘portable’ such as meetings, networking or a photography shoot.

The key is to remember to press play and stop; my sister used a similar app to time her walk to work and it thought she’d spent 12 hours getting there…

Screenshot of Toggl weekly report on desktop
An example of the weekly report you can see on the desktop version of Toggl. You can see daily activity as well as activities broken down by project or client.

 


What’s next?

Everyone’s creative business will be different, so the tools that are right for you might not work well for the next business owner. But if the tools I’ve tried, tested and recommend sound useful, here are the links to download them.

Google Calendar: Google Play / iPhone / Web

Google Keep: Google Play / iPhone / Web

Outlook : Google Play / iPhone / Web

Tide: Google Play / iPhone

Toggl: Google Play / iPhone / Web


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The 5 Tools I Use to Maximise My Time and Energy as a Creative Business Owner - Eleanor Snare - Keeping on top of all the tasks in your creative business is tough. These are the five tools I've tried, tested and use every day to help me manage my work and enjoy what I do.